DIY Home AC Recharge

Want To Learn How To Charge Your Home AC System To Have It Blowing Ice Cold Like New Again?

Before we begin let me start off by saying your air conditioner should never be low on refrigerant.  Freon (R-22) and Puron (R-410a)  systems are sealed circuits so they should always have the same amount of refrigerant that they did when they were installed. The only reason you should ever find your AC low on refrigerant is if your air conditioner has developed a leak. Below we are going to simplify checking and charging your AC system all while leaving out  the AC mumbo jumbo you don’t care about.

3 Reasons Your AC Develops A Leak

Lack Of Maintenance Or Neglect

Manufacturer Defect

Age Of System

Signs Your AC Is Low On Freon Or Puron 

Not Blowing Cold Air

Long Run Time

Can Reach Set Temperature

AC Lines Freezing

Checking Freon Or Puron Simplified 

In order to check the refrigerant levels on your air conditioner you will need refrigerant gauges. If you do not own a pair or know someone that will lend you theirs I have a special link to contractor priced gauges here.

Once you have your gauges turn your air conditioner on cool mode and then attach the blue hose to the larger of the two copper pipes on the outdoor unit.

Read the label on your outdoor AC unit to determine what kind of refrigerant your system takes. Air conditioners installed 2009 and before are typically Freon (R-22) and those installed after are most likely Puron (R-410a).

If your air conditioner runs on R-22 the desired PSI is 75.

If your air conditioner runs on R-410a the desired PSI is 125.

If your system is more than 5 PSI below the desired number your AC desperately needs refrigerant. In order to handle refrigerant or purchase by law you are supposed to have an EPA license. For those  DIY home owners and handy folks R-22 and R-410a are available through Amazon. R-22 is being phased out by the EPA therefore the price of it is extremely high so I have provided a links for an  R-22 alternative 407c as well as the real stuff.

          

Charging Refrigerant 

With blue hose attached to the copper pipe attach the yellow hose to your refrigerant canister.

Open the valve on the refrigerant canister all the way. For R-22 and 407c do this right side up. For R-410a do this upside down as well as charge upside down.

turn the handle on your gauges  to allow refrigerant to charge in 10 second increments with a 1 minute pause in between to allow refrigerant to cycle through air conditioner.

For Ways To Prevent A Freon Leak 

Preventing A Freon Leak

4 Replies to “DIY Home AC Recharge”

  1. Lots of quality information here. People are so quick to hire somebody to fix their issues. Nice to see people like yourself empowering people to do it on their own!

  2. Under Repair Tutorials you described how to replace a defective capacitor. AC repairs of this sort has cost me several hundred dollars in the past so I was very interested. I’m no electrician but I know that capacitors are dangerous because the store voltage. Aren’t you supposed to discharge the capacitor before attempting to remove it? If not, why not? If so, what procedure would you recommend?

    1. Hey Mr.Evon !

      Capacitors now a days do not hold a charge no need to worry. Just disconnect the power and change out the wires one by one from the old to the new capacitor.

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